Let’s start to examine the impact of end-to-end visibility and ways it can be put to work for your organization.  For starters, let’s dig into correlation.

Correlation involves identifying related actions and events as a file moves through a series of business processes (including what happens after a file is moved, renamed, or deleted), and using that information to make business decisions.  Correlation can also associate file transfer metadata with downstream processes such as whether a product was shipped or an invoice was paid after an order was received from a customer.

Ipswitch’s Frank Kenney shares some thoughts in the video below on why correlation is an especially important part of visibility and how it enables you to really understand not only file transfers, but also the applications, processes, purchase orders and other items in your infrastructure that tie back to customers, SLA’s and revenue..

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZOSoT95oFUg[/youtube]
Correlation enables users to easily view all the events related to the transfer and consumption of a single file or set of files, including subsequent applications and resulting business processes.  For example, they can track a file through a complete workflow and throughout its entire lifecycle, even if it was shared with a customer or business partner  – critical insight that can impact the quality and timeliness of work, service level agreements, not to mention revenue and profitability.

Last week I ranted a bit about the importance of governing your cloud vendors.  At about the same time, Ipswitch’s Frank Kenney participated in a panel discussion on cloud security at the Interop conference in Las Vegas.

As you know, there is great debate over whether cloud services are secure enough for businesses to use.  I believe that the cloud model will quickly evolve and prove itself to a point where security is deemed no riskier than doing business with solely on-premises tools.

I also believe that member-driven organizations such as the Cloud Security Alliance – which focus on providing security assurance within Cloud Computing – will help us get there.

At the Interop discussion, Frank Kenney spoke about the safety of the cloud, here’s what he had to say:

“Cloud customers have the obligation to assess the risk of allowing data to be stored in a cloud based on how valuable it is to the customers…. The cloud is as secure as you want it to be.

Cloud services can provide value if performance and service-level agreements align with what customers need.  If not, customers shouldn’t buy them.  It’s not ‘the sky is falling’.  Assign risks appropriately.  Security is just one of many things you have to do.”