With all the news around the Apple iPad, I was determined that I would not buy one until the second generation became available. With the second generation, prices will undoubtedly come down and I’ll get more functionality than what’s available in the first generation. I learned my lesson with the first iPhone and the first iPod.

As I sat around on Sunday feeling very smug, I looked over at my five-year-old son who was playing with his iPod Touch. It hit me that not only do I have to base the decision of when to buy an iPad on my technology geekness, I have to base it on my son’s needs and desires. Simply put, the iPad, and similar gadgets, were not built for my generation…but built for my son’s.

With more and more digital natives entering the workplace and procuring executive positions in companies all over the world, the traditional methodologies, mechanisms, and technologies for dealing with risk will have to change. The reason for this is simple: digital natives place a different level of risk on personal and enterprise intellectual property and information. In a world where everyone can be found on Facebook and the intimate details of every company can be found via blog sites, forum discussions, and on a company’s website itself, determining how much risk should be assigned to any individual piece of information is changing and in fact becoming more dynamic.

Let’s expand this thought. What do we need to do to ensure that our technology is being built for use by “Generation I” (ones who always had iPods) and digital natives? If issues around security and trust dramatically change, as we see them already, what does the future WS_FTP client and WS_FTP server  look like? What are the expectations that our future customers will have for this technology? Is it just a new experience, e.g. GUI change? Or do we assume that many of the basics around security and management are taken care of? What does it mean for portability and mobility? Should a user be able to carry around their WS_FTP license for use on any machine? This begs an answer to the question…are Google, Apple and Microsoft my real competitors or are they just enabling the underlying infrastructure that will be and should be commoditized?

These are real questions that need real answers…and we need to have those answers very soon. As we embark on delivering technology and services that are aligned with our next-generation architecture, issues such as what to do about “Generation I” and digital natives must be addressed.

Just a few thoughts…