A quick summary of key industry happenings:

A) The economic impact of piracy (including software) is *really* not understood: http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-10-423. See pages 15 – 19 of the full report in particular.

I’ve always been skeptical of the piracy claims, good to see someone actually reviewed them. I think it is better for the industry to focus on the valued real customer rather than to fabricate and fret about the unknown and unquantifiable pirate customer.

read more “HTML 5, Memristors and Software Piracy”

It’s great to have a line that’s far above the rest. It’s great to see that in the Magic quadrant, it’s great to see that in a wave, it’s great to see that in any industry report. But what does it all mean? The technology provider I understand that corporate executives like dashboards, spreadsheets, charts and graphs. These are the tools that many of them used to run their businesses day-to-day. But what does it mean to see a spike in the line; or what does it mean to see a drop in the line? The key to any reporting capability is to have solid analysis and analytics. For instance a marketing executive needs to know why the dramatic spikes in news reference volume from some vendors and not others. That same executive would also want to consider why search trends don’t follow news volume.

read more “Looking Deeper Into The Data: Analysis and Analytics”

With the announcement last week that Google is adding file transfer to Google Talk, I had some thoughts.  

1). Are there security challenges posed by the Google Talk news?

These challenges are similar to those we’ve seen with Windows Live, AIM, ICQ, Trillian, Skype and others, which all offer peer-to-peer mechanisms. But unlike these forums, Google – and Google Chat – deserve deeper scrutiny over the ubiquity and consumerization Google brings.

For example, it’s likely that Google Talk, and thus file transfer, will now be included within Google’s free productivity suite, Google Docs – which is frequently used as a means for flexible, faster business collaboration and file exchange

read more “Let’s Talk About Google Talk”

Those of you who visited the Ipswitch File Transfer tradeshow booth at the recent RSA Security Conference were likely asked to fill out a short survey.  When the show ended, we tabulated the survey results and there are some staggering data points that we want to share:

  • 83% of IT executives surveyed lack visibility into files moving both internally and externally
  • Nearly 90 percent of survey respondents admitted to using thumb drives or other external devices to move work-related files
  • 66 percent of survey respondents admitted to using personal emails to send work-related files
  • More than 25 percent admitted to sending proprietary files to their personal email accounts, with the intent of using that information at their next place of employment

Here’s my colleague Frank Kenny, VP of Global Strategy at Ipswitch File Transfer, sharing his thoughts on the survey results.


The key takeaway here is that IT organizations are at a greater risk for sensitive company information ending up in the wrong hands if they don’t know who is accessing company information and how they use/move files, where they send them, and to whom they are sent to.  It’s not enough to secure common data access points or provide tools for some employees.  Rather, true visibility into all file and data interactions enables IT organizations to then actively manage, secure and enforce policies for company information, both inside and outside of the organization.

Frank Kenney, VP of Global Strategy, Ipswitch

Frank Kenney, Ipswitch’s VP of Global Strategy, recently spoke in London at a press conference for InfoSecurity Europe, Europe’s leading information security event which take place on April 27-29, 2010.

Dan Raywood from SC Magazine UK attended this week’s press conference and his article can be seen below:

Problem with the professional consumer is leading to an information security headache
Dan Raywood  January 15, 2010

The culture of the professional consumer, or ‘prosumer’, is leading to increased problems within the workplace.

L. Frank Kenney, vice president global strategy at Ipswitch File Transfer, explained that a ‘prosumer’ is a consumer buyer who purchases an electronic device from personal funds but intends to use it primarily for business rather than consumer applications.

read more “Frank Kenney: Problem with the prosumer is leading to an information security headache”

With awareness of data breaches at an all-time high, financial
institutions are working hard to implement policies and solutions
that protect sensitive financial information along with their
reputations and industry competitiveness. In today’s digital
world, critical financial data is being sent back and forth between
businesses and individuals at speeds faster than anyone ever
thought possible. While this information exchange allows financial
institutions to deliver higher levels of service and capitalise on
emerging growth opportunities, it also leaves them vulnerable to
security breaches and data leaks.
Hermes a multi-specialist asset manager, owned by BT Pension
Scheme (BTPS), deals with a huge amount of sensitive data and,
therefore, turned to Ipswitch to provide them with a secure and
reliable solution to help protect the transfer of data and information.
Requiring a fully versatile solution they installed Ipswitch’s MOVEit DMZ Enterprise.
Hermes offers a range of investment solutions ranging from alternative strategies, such as fund of hedge
funds and commodities, to engagement focus funds, real estate, private equity and specialist equity products.
Its pension fund management service, Hermes Pension Fund Management Limited (HPFM), runs alongside
its multi-specialist structure and acts as the executive arm of the BT Pension Scheme (BTPS). Hermes
currently invests assets on behalf of 204 clients across these product areas and has over £20 billion under
management.
“We needed to host an FTP site so that people could post information to us, which, obviously, needed to be
very secure due to the sensitivity of the data,” explained Jamie Dewar, Technical Services Manager, Hermes.
“We didn’t host FTP before as we were a ‘pull only’ organisation and just used the basic Microsoft mainline
tools. However, due to changing business requirements we required an enterprise-class FTP solution that
was highly secure.”
MOVEit DMZ is an enterprise data transfer server that boasts end-to-end encrypted transfer and storage of
data, as well as delivering powerful administration and reporting capabilities. It resides on a secure server in
a ‘de-militarised zone’ (DMZ) attached to a firewall. This enables it to be accessed through the firewall from
both inside and outside of a network for transfers including End-User-to-End-User, End-User-to-Backend-
System and Backend-System-to-Backend-System.

With awareness of data breaches at an all-time high, financial institutions are working hard to implement policies and solutions that protect sensitive financial information along with their reputations and industry competitiveness. In today’s digital world, critical financial data is being sent back and forth between businesses and individuals at speeds faster than anyone ever thought possible. While this information exchange allows financial institutions to deliver higher levels of service and capitalise on emerging growth opportunities, it also leaves them vulnerable to security breaches and data leaks.

Hermes a multi-specialist asset manager, owned by BT Pension Scheme (BTPS), deals with a huge amount of sensitive data and, therefore, turned to Ipswitch to provide them with a secure and reliable solution to help protect the transfer of data and information. Requiring a fully versatile solution they installed Ipswitch’s MOVEit DMZ Enterprise.

“We needed to host an FTP site so that people could post information to us, which, obviously, needed to be very secure due to the sensitivity of the data,” explained Jamie Dewar, Technical Services Manager, Hermes. “We didn’t host FTP before as we were a ‘pull only’ organisation and just used the basic Microsoft mainline tools. However, due to changing business requirements we required an enterprise-class FTP solution that was highly secure.”

Read more about Hermes and how they protect their private data: http://www.ipswitchft.com/resources/case-studies/moveit/enterprise-file-transfer-compliance