Network Monitoring tools are a must-have for organizations of all sizes. When evaluating solutions focus is often placed on comparing features and ease of use, but understanding the total cost of ownership is very important. The core licensing structure, whether it is device-based, port- or interface-based, or measurement-based, can have a big impact on license costs up front and the administrative workload for maintaining the solution in production over the lifetime of the product.

Join Jim Frey, VP of Research, at Enterprise Management Associates and Brian M. Jacobs, Senior Product Manager, at Ipswitch – Network Management Division, as they discuss what you should know about licensing for network monitoring solutions.

This webinar will cover:

  • Understanding the Cost of Enterprise Network Monitoring Tools
  • Licensing Models – Similarities and Differences
  • Choosing a Licensing Strategy That is Best for You
  • An Example:  WhatsUp Gold Licensing Approach
  • Case Studies:  Device-based Licensing Experiences
  • Key Takeaways  and Q&A

Date and time:
Tuesday, April 2, 2013
10am US EST

register-button

Now you can isolate issues and resolve network and application problems before users are even aware anything is wrong. The new, easy to-use WhatsUp Application Performance Monitor, lets you diagnose and fix complex application performance problems quickly from within a unified dashboard.

Application Performance Monitor Highlights:
• Proactively alert and automatically repair potential problems before applications fail—to ensure continuous up-time with limited IT resources.
• Quickly identify root causes of application performance problems— across network, server or multi-tier application or component dependencies.
• Gain the valuable insight necessary to improve application availability and performance – through real time and historical reporting and analysis.

Join Brian M. Jacobs, Senior Product Manager, on Tuesday, March 26th as he demonstrates how easy it is to discover, map and monitor your network and applications with the WhatsUp Gold suite. Register now!

webinar-8am-button-en

 

 

webinar-2pm-button-en

 

 

webinar-7pm-button

 

 

Businesses face a real threat – their employees. That’s right, increasingly tech-savvy employees have turned to a diverse range of file transfer tools that are beyond the sight of IT management.

personal file sharing leads to enterprise risk

Employees see webmail, file sharing services, cloud storage, USB sticks and smart devices as easier to use than traditional corporate tools to transfer files. But this trend ignores the security risks and regulatory implications of using file transfer methods entirely outside of corporate control.

Here’re five things you should know about your employees’ habits and the need for secure file transfer technology:

1) Insecure means are used to send confidential files.Recent surveys we have run to monitor user behavior found that a vast majority (84%) of respondents send classified or confidential information through corporate email attachments. Of those, 72% do this at least weekly and 52% daily. That means employees are using unsanctioned tools in record numbers, resulting in a lack of visibility and control.

2) Many employees use personal email to send company documents and data.
Users may think they can’t afford delays or slowdowns associated with jumping through perceived hoops to send out information and files that keep business humming. And if the business doesn’t provide the tools they need to send large and confidential attachments, or if the processes and technologies are too difficult to use, then users will take matters into their own hands – and their own email.

3) Employees are using consumer-grade file transfer services for business purposes.
If the corporate email system limits the size of file attachments or if IT vetoes service requests, resourceful employees don’t throw up their hands in resignation: they look for workarounds. And the growing popularity of file transfer sites and cloud services aimed at consumers is making it easier for business users to sidestep IT. More than half of the users we surveyed admitted they use these services.

4) Risk of data theft is high.
When business users aren’t turning to personal email accounts or free file-sharing services, they may be putting files on USB thumb drives, smartphones or other external devices. Unfortunately, our market research shows that almost one-third of users had lost a USB device, smartphone or other external device containing business or personal information – a tremendous risk for any organisation.

5) IT Management Visibility into Data Management is Low, Putting Businesses at Risk.
Most companies create and maintain policies that mandate the use of approved tools for moving and sharing information. However, our research shows fewer than 32% strictly enforce these policies, making these mandates largely meaningless. No visibility means no compliance with internal policies or external regulations and laws.

The file sharing habits of employees can be risky but is driven by their desire to get work done. The business need and IT desire to control file sharing is equally important. Fortunately, companies don’t have to choose between risky behavior and productivity. Using secure managed file transfer technology, employees can get the convenience, ease-of-use, and speed they need while IT and the business get the control, visibility, security and compliance they need.

When you evaluate application performance monitoring solutions, comparing capabilities is one key part of the assessment. But it can be misleading. Many application performance monitoring solutions include features that, while interesting, are not critical to you. Sometimes the feature-rich solutions are more costly, complex, and difficult to implement than you want. But sometimes more affordable products include features that aren’t high priority to you. The cost isn’t itself the determinant of whether products have more features than you need; it’s more a question of how closely each solution fits your purpose.

Before you assess specific capabilities in solutions you are evaluating, it’s important to clarify and prioritize your goals:

Goal Priority
Ensuring the availability and performance of critical applications
Gain visibility over the entire IT service  that supports an application
Reducing user complaints
Improving MTTR time
Improving reporting (out of the box and customizable)
Eliminating alert overload and time spent unnecessarily on low-priority issues
Meeting SLA goals
Controlling IT costs
Other:

Once you identify your highest priorities, the next step is to map them to specific product capabilities. For example, if improving your MTTR time is a top priority, you should look for monitoring products with strong capabilities for:

  • Monitoring, alerting and reporting on an application’s entire IT service
  • Allowing you to define critical application dependencies so you can find the root cause quickly
  • Presenting one unified dashboard so you can see problems quickly and drill down to the root cause
  • Letting you customize automated actions in response to specific conditions so issues can be detected and repairs made without delay
  • Providing out-of-the-box reports so you can easily track metrics such as MTTR rates over time

If you also give a high priority to reducing user complaints, you’d need the first four of the above capabilities plus end user monitoring to alert and report on the effect of web application performance on user experience.

This exercise of documenting your prioritized goals and mapping them to product capabilities puts you in a better position to select a solution that will not disappoint.